The Community Club

David Kyle Choe
David Kyle Choe

Posted on

Need Advice From Community Pros - Lightning in a Bottle

Hi everyone,

Happy to be here. I actually would love to crowdsource some advice for building my community. Obviously, happy to do it here, but if offline is more comfortable, more than happy to set that up as well.

Here's our situation. I'm currently building Staat, which is an analytics tool for engineering managers. We're starting to feel some energy and excitement around our product and growth and nearly halfway filled up for our beta launch.

I'd love to hear how the community pros here would approach building a community at the stage we're at now: pre-product, about to launch beta, small co-founding team, bootstrapped.

We want to "bottle the lightning" we have, no matter how small it may seem.

More than happy to treat y'all to an e-coffee or anything else really!

Discussion (8)

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brianoblinger profile image
Brian Oblinger

Hi David,

Congrats on the business! I've spent time at analytics companies and build communities around them. Great space to be in.

Given the stage you're at, I believe that the best path forward is to take the approach that your community can be major contributors via feedback and ideation as you build the product together. Engaging engineering managers as a community of practice to deeply understand their wants and needs will also be beneficial (look to Commsor/Community Club as a great example).

The great news is that community-led is a super scalable way to think about building a business, especially when you're bootstrapping with a small team.

Would love to hear more about what you're working on and offer any help that I can along the way.

Brian

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davidkylechoe profile image
David Kyle Choe Author

Hi Brian,

Thanks so much for the thoughtful reply. I'd love to take you up on the offer. Maybe we can have a quick 20 min call? Happy to treat you to an e-coffee :)

David@staat.co

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oana profile image
Oana Filip

Hi David,

I work at Pixelgrade, a design studio where we create WordPress products since 2011.
What worked for us (also a small independent & bootstrapped team) was transparent from the early days. We created Transparency Reports every six months and shared everything that made sense: from money to people, from product to marketing strategies. Here's the latest: pixelgrade.com/upstairs/transparen...

As a community builder with ten years of experience, I noticed that being transparent and asking for help is always a to-do. Ask your current tribe, no matter how small it is, their expectations, why they stick around if they would like to contribute, and such.

You might be surprised. Cheers! 😎

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davidkylechoe profile image
David Kyle Choe Author

This is really great advice.

What was the feedback on the very first Transparency Report?

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oana profile image
Oana Filip

Hi David! Well, it depends who you ask, but from what the Co-founders told me, people were very supportive and grateful for such openness. Peers started to do similar reports; customers were a bit mindblown about the level of information we provided; the team was happy because we kept our promise around transparency.

Maybe a report is too much, but a newsletter made with the same approach in mind can do the job. In the end, it's more about the intention than the medium per se. Cheers!

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davidkylechoe profile image
David Kyle Choe Author

Awesome! We are super into it. I read the most recent one, and I think having a sneak peek into a company just makes folks more invested. Feels so much more human.

I was especially interested in the office remodeling process.

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oana profile image
Oana Filip

I'm happy I could lend a hand. If you need in-depth details, including the remodeling process, please ping me at oana@pixelgrade.com. I will gladly follow-up. Cheers! 😎

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davidkylechoe profile image
David Kyle Choe Author

Awesome! Thanks so much