The Community Club

Fernando Nikolic
Fernando Nikolic

Posted on

When to turn an audience to a community?

Hey y'all, a quick backstory before I ask my questions:

I have a newsletter with 500+ subscribers that started about 9 months ago. When people sign up, they get redirected to a Typeform asking them what else they'd like to see.

"Community" is the clear winner, so I'm playing with the idea of how that would look like.

My question is: What is the critical mass # that's large enough to turn an audience to a community?

I'm thinking that although I'm getting some leading indicators from my audience that they'd like a community, I'm not sure the pool is large enough to make it active and dynamic.

Would love to get your inputs, here to learn :)

Discussion (4)

Collapse
alex123 profile image
Alex

I think it all depends on what you want to do with the community and how you're measuring 'active'. A Twitch streamer with say 800 followers and an average of 25 viewers can have a community and not just an audience (often with a Discord etc), but that community may only be particularly active in the time preceding, during, and just after a stream.

So maybe you want to do weekly discussions on the topic of your newsletter or something like that, which will peak activity. It just depends - what I will say is that just because your audience says they'd like a community, you yourself should have reasons you'd like to change the relationship from audience to community, and once/if you do, you can use those reasons as goals to measure success against.

Collapse
fernando profile image
Fernando Nikolic Author

That's super insightful, Alex - thanks!

My personal reason is for the communication not to be that one-sided. I get replies to my newsletter editions that gets me thinking "this would be so much more fun if other like-minded peers could chip in their two cents instead of just me"

But this a great thinking framework that begs to be explored deeper. Thanks again for your input!

Collapse
ben profile image
Ben Halpern

@thepracticaldev turned into DEV slowly and steadily.... Originally asking folks to post to DEV as a way to get shared with the community, as opposed to trying to early on to foster that natural multi-sided marketplace.

Collapse
marygreencny profile image
Mary Green

Most of the best communities grow slowly and steadily over time. A lot of startups start building community right from the beginning. I'd suggest going from audience to community as soon as you start.